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Viagra Reduces Colorectal Cancer Risk in Mice, Study Finds

Viagra Reduces Colorectal Cancer Risk in Mice, Study FindsSmall doses of Viagra appear to cut colorectal cancer risk in mice, perhaps by as much as 50%, according to a new paper in the journal Cancer Prevention Research.

It’s still unclear whether the findings can apply to humans, but future research is planned.

Colorectal cancer occurs in the colon and/or rectum, two parts of the large intestine. The colon helps with digestion, sending waste to the rectum before it leaves the body as stool. Sometimes, small growths called polyps form in the lining of the colon or rectum. Most of the time, polyps aren’t a problem. However, they can become cancerous.

The research team worked with a group of mice who had a genetic mutation that caused them to develop more polyps than normal. This type of mutation can happen in humans, too, leading to hundreds of polyps and a greater likelihood of cancer.

Each mouse received a small, daily dose of Viagra in its drinking water. Over time, the researchers discovered that Viagra cut the number of polyps in the mice by half.

Sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra, increases levels of a chemical called cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which may ultimately benefit the lining of the colon, the study suggested.

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