Search For a Provider Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube ES View the Patient Toolkit Contact Us

News

About 2 in 3 Women Would Take a Sex Health Drug

Mar 21, 2017

About 2 in 3 Women Would Take a Sex Health Drug

Are women interested in sexuality-boosting medication? And if so, what results would they like to see? These questions and more were the focus of a survey published recently in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

While sex health drugs like Viagra have been available for men for several years, medications for women are fairly new. Generally, women’s sexual problems have been treated with counseling and therapy.

In August 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved flibanserin (Addyi) for the treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD). Women with HSDD struggle with low libido that can’t be explained by another medical condition or a medication they’re taking. The situation causes great distress and can affect a woman’s personal relationships.

Despite its goal of improving sexual desire in women with HSDD and increasing the number of positive sexual encounters, flibanserin has not been widely used. This study assessed women’s feelings about sexuality boosting medication.

The researchers surveyed 159 women in Switzerland. The women ranged in age from 18 to 73 years with an average age of 32 years. They answered a wide range of questions about their sex lives, relationships, and personalities. They also answered questions on their willingness to take a sex health drug and what they would expect from such a medication.

Sixty-one percent said they were open to the idea, and women with poorer sexual function were more likely to feel this way. Of those who would not take a sex health drug, 45% said they did not want to use a medication for sexual purposes and 35% said they were satisfied with their level of sexual desire, so they would have no need for a drug.

When asked which particular aspects of sex they would like to see enhanced, orgasm frequency and intensity were the two top responses. Increased desire was another concern. Overall, about three-quarters said they would like to improve their sexual satisfaction and almost half hoped they could have more fun during sex.

The researchers found that women who were more conscientious were less willing to take a sex health drug, in contrast to less conscientious women who were more willing. The latter group might have had a “more flexible and spontaneous mindset,” the authors noted.

The researchers were unsure whether medications for sexual problems would become the norm, however.

“In recent decades, the female sexual dysfunction treatment paradigm has been mostly limited to cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy, and according to our study data, it is still doubtful whether expanding it to include drug treatment would provide additional benefits,” they wrote.

Resources

The Journal of Sexual Medicine

Gutsche, Melanie, MSc and Andrea Burri, PhD

“What Women Want—An Explorative Study on Women's Attitudes Toward Sexuality Boosting Medication in a Sample of Swiss Women”

(Full-text. Published online: January 24, 2017)

http://www.jsm.jsexmed.org/article/S1743-6095(17)30002-4/fulltext