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Does a Man’s Sexual Interest Affect His Partner’s Sexual Function?

Sep 21, 2016

Does a Man’s Sexual Interest Affect His Partner’s Sexual Function?

How might a man’s sexual issue affect the sexuality of his female partner? It’s a complicated question, but a new study by Italian scientists suggests that the way women perceive their partner’s sexual interest could be a factor.

Past research has focused on sexual problems like erectile dysfunction (ED), premature ejaculation (PE), and delayed ejaculation (DE) and their effects on women’s sexual health. However, for many of these studies, the focus was on diagnosing and treating a man’s sexual problem.

In this study, the researchers wanted to know more about how a man’s sexual factors – considered from a woman’s point of view – might influence female sexual function.

The study involved 156 heterosexual women who had been in a stable relationship during the previous six months. On average, the women were around 47 years old; their partners’ average age was 50. Eighty-three percent of the couples were living together.

Each woman completed a questionnaire called the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). This is one of the most common tools used to assess female sexual problems, covering the domains of sexual desire, arousal, vaginal lubrication, orgasm, pain, and overall sexual satisfaction. Higher scores on the FSFI mean better sexual function.

The women also had physical exams and answered questions about their psychological well-being, sexual desire, lifestyles, medications, and relationships with their partners.

About 37% of the women had a partner with a sexual problem. About a third felt their partner had lost his desire for them. Almost a quarter of the partners had ED, 14% had PE, and 8% had delayed ejaculation.

After analyzing the data, the researchers discovered that FSFI scores tended to go down when the couple had disagreements and did not live together. Scores also went down when women had intercourse just to please their partner.

In contrast, FSFI scores generally increased when women had intercourse more often or when they were trying to conceive a child.

Women who perceived low desire in their partner had lower FSFI scores overall as well as in the arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain domains. However, no correlation was found between FSFI scores and a partner’s problems with erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, or delayed ejaculation.

In addition, women who felt their partner had less sexual interest tended to masturbate more often, have intercourse less often, and feel that the man did not care about the woman’s sexual pleasure.

“It can be speculated that erectile function and ejaculatory behavior are not the most pressing concerns in the perspective of women with [female sexual dysfunction],” wrote the study authors. “Conversely, among factors related to their partner’s sexuality, feeling unloved and/or undesired is the main determinant of sexual impairment.”

The study was published online in July in the journal Andrology.

Resources

Andrology

Maseroli, E., et al.

“Which are the male factors associated with female sexual dysfunction (FSD)?”

(Full-text. First published: July 13, 2016)

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/andr.12224/full