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Conditions: Retrograde Ejaculation

Treating Retrograde Ejaculation

Since retrograde ejaculation isn't harmful, it typically doesn't require treatment unless it interferes with fertility. In such cases, treatment depends on the underlying cause.

If your doctor discovers that a prescribed medication is the cause, switching to a comparable medication or discontinuation of the drug often restores normal ejaculation.

Unfortunately, if retrograde ejaculation is caused by surgery or diabetes, it is often not correctable. However, some medications have been shown to improve muscle tone of the bladder neck and therefore reduce the loss of semen into the bladder during ejaculation.  These medications include: epinephrine sulfate and epinephrine-like drugs (such as pseudoephedrine, imipramine, midodrin, desipramine and brompheniramine maleate).

Alternatively, men are sometimes encouraged to ejaculate when their bladder is full since having a full bladder can increase bladder neck closure.

If the above measures are not options or are not successful and fertility is still a concern, it is also possible for an urologist to retrieve sperm from a man's urine following an orgasm and use it for artificial insemination.

It is also possible for men, prior to receiving treatments or surgeries that bring the risk of retrograde ejaculation, to have their semen cryopreserved (frozen) for insemination later.

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