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Can You Trust Sex Health Product Reviews?

Can you trust sex health product reviews?Caveat emptor! Let the buyer beware!

You’ve probably heard these phrases before. And the advice is sound for sex health products as well.

Many people prefer buying sex items online for the variety and convenience. Also, there is some degree of confidentiality in online shopping. A person who feels too embarrassed to buy a sex health supplement in person might have no qualms about doing so through an internet retailer.

Customer reviews are an important part of consumer research. After all, if most customers rate a product highly, it must be a good, right?

Not always.

Some companies pay people to write positive customer reviews and place them on retailers’ websites. In this way, they can skew ratings and sell more products. Other reviews can be biased.

It’s sometimes difficult to distinguish a genuine review from a “fake” one. Fortunately, websites like ReviewMeta and Fakespot can sort the information.

After a user types in a product URL, these sites analyze the reviews, testing for red flags. Suspicious reviews are then removed, and the product rating is adjusted.

ReviewMeta and Fakespot aren’t substitutes for doing your own research, of course. They also don’t work for all retailers. Currently, ReviewMeta analyzes only Amazon.com reviews. Fakespot has a somewhat longer list that includes Amazon and Walmart.

Remember, too, that your healthcare provider can advise you about products you’re considering. In fact, your doctor is a great place to start! He or she knows your personal situation, the medications you take, and your overall health status. Taking these factors into account can help you find the most appropriate plan.

Resources

CNet.com

Broida, Rick

“How to spot fake reviews on Amazon, Best Buy, Walmart and other sites”

(March 4, 2019)

https://www.cnet.com/how-to/spot-fake-reviews-amazon-best-buy-walmart/

Fakespot.com

“How does Fakespot work?”

https://www.fakespot.com/about

NPR

Kailath, Ryan

“Some Amazon Reviews Are Too Good To Be Believed. They're Paid For”

(July 30, 2018)

https://www.npr.org/2018/07/30/629800775/some-amazon-reviews-are-too-good-to-be-believed-theyre-paid-for

ReviewMeta.com

“How it Works”

(April 28, 2016)

https://reviewmeta.com/blog/how-it-works/