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Most Young Men Satisfied With Hypospadias Repair

Most Young Men Satisfied With Hypospadias RepairFor the most part, young men who were born with hypospadias are “happy” that they had surgical repair as children, even if they were too young to consent to the procedure themselves at the time, researchers report in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

Hypospadias is a congenital (present at birth) condition that affects about 1 in 200 baby boys. Typically, a boy’s penis develops so that the meatus – the opening of the urethra – is located at the tip. Thus, he urinates from the tip of his penis.

With hypospadias, the meatus is found in a location other than the tip. Sometimes it’s found in in the middle of the penis shaft or closer to the scrotum. The boy can still urinate, but he might need to sit to do so. He might spray urine, too.

Most boys with hypospadias have surgery to correct it, usually by the time they’re 18 months old. Surgeons can place the meatus at the tip, but in some cases, more than one surgery is needed.

How do boys feels about their experiences when they grow up? Researchers surveyed 193 adolescent and young adult men (aged 16 to 21) who had had surgical repair of hypospadias as children.

About 80% of the men were satisfied with their overall results and 87% said they were satisfied with the appearance of their penis. About 10% had “mild” problems with erections and ejaculation.

“Based on our data, deferring hypospadias repair until the patient can decide himself is not warranted,” the authors concluded.

Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

“Facts about Hypospadias”

(Page last reviewed: December 5, 2019)

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/hypospadias.html

Journal of Sexual Medicine

Tack, Lloyd J.W., MD, et al.

“Psychosexual Outcome, Sexual Function, and Long-Term Satisfaction of Adolescent and Young Adult Men After Childhood Hypospadias Repair”

(Full-text. Published: May 19, 2020)

https://www.jsm.jsexmed.org/article/S1743-6095(20)30207-1/fulltext